Day 3 of POSSE NIGERIA

Samuel and I left Mowe for Ikire at the end of the RUN’s (Redeemer’s University, Nigeria) POSSE. While we enjoyed viewing the countryside, it was a depressing journey. The Lagos-Ibadan expressway is always undergoing repair and so was it during our trip. We were in a terrible traffic for hours; and at some point, I decided that we continue with the last leg of the trip (Ibadan-Ikire) the following morning.

POSSENG@UniOsun was also a huge success, though we had only a day to interact with the participants. We succeeded in summarizing all that were thought at RUN in the last two days.There was suffice time for coding, demonstrations and Q&A.

In all honesty, we met another set of engaging students. I remember a student asked me a thoughtful question – most programming languages are written in English Language and so are applications built using the programming languages. As a linguistic student, how can one change the language used in a program/application?

I understood the question; he was not only asking about localizing the programs but also internationalizing them (most notably their encoding). He had asked me if the statements, instructions, e.t.c. in a code can be changed from English Language to a different language (with their diacritical marks) and still get the application run. I answered the question and gave some pointers on how he can take it up as a research work.

One of the reasons of running POSSENG in two venues was that we wanted to ease the transportation and accommodation problems/costs for the participants. And it worked. At Ikire, we had academics and students, who had come from Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife as well as some Mozilla reps.

dsc06082

POSSENG@UniOsun

POSSENG@UniOsun

 

This event marks the end of POSSE Nigeria. Many thanks to the sponsor – Mozilla Foundation and the hosts – RUN and UniOsun. Pictures from the Mozilla Club, UniOsun

Comments (1)

Day 2 of POSSE NIGERIA

The assignment that was given to the students was evaluated and used to select who will join us for the second day of POSSENG. It was a simple assignment and was meant to determine how committed the attendees were to the workshop. They had been asked to create a blog and write their first day experience as their (first) blogpost. Here are some of the blogposts from the attendees – http://samsonarekete.simplesite.com/367547540 ; http://murewaayodele.wordpress.com/ ; http://fumyteezfascinatingfortitude.wordpress.com/ ; https://awedebby.wordpress.com/ ; http://oyebodem.wordpress.com .

After deciding who will be joining us for the Day 2, we began the day by exploring some community projects that can be of interest to the team. One of such projects is software localization. I spent the next three hours showing them how to do online and offline translations using Pootle in Mozilla, transifex in Fedora and Virtaal. In addition, they signed up on the Mozilla localization website, and for some of them, their  accounts were upgraded so hat they can review translations, download compressed locale files and view other projects. A language pack later was built for the translation into Yoruba Language and it was tested.

At some time, the students wanted to see how remote debugging works and I got some folks (Yoric and gerard-majax) on the Mozilla #b2g channel to demonstrate it. I had earlier shown the participants some of the testing and debugging tools used for the B2g/FirefoxOS project.

firefoxOS_debug_chat

firefoxOS_debug_chat

One of the common challenges for the academics there is that they do not know how to realize their various projects/research works. Hence, we changed focus from debugging to applied research. After carefully listening to the academics, I realized I need to show them how to build a project from source and hack it in order to achieve their goals. Some of the projects that were suggested are Weka, Winbugs (also known as Openbugs) and NS3. For them, they wanted to enhance the application(s) in order to take measurements/readings in a new scale and/or units. They would like to implement such work(s), which is most times the core of their postgraduate works, and release the work to the public domain. In order to increase their level of confidence, I demonstrated how to build Weka and Winbugs from source. We pulled their source code and built them up. I later showed them what files make up the applications and how to hack a typical application.

The closing of POSSE NG in RUN was done by the HoDs of the Computer Science and Statistical Mathematics Departments. Like yesterday, it also lasted for eight hours. Many thanks to Samuel for his support. Although he could not assume the role of a POSSE instructor, his technical support was highly appreciated by all the participants. And Samuel and I later headed for the University of Osun for the third day of POSSE NG.

Comments

Day 1 of POSSE NIGERIA

The management of RUN (Redeemer’s University, Nigeria) attended the opening event. The Vice Chancellor (VC) was going to open the event; unfortunately, he could not make it (owing to other engagements). There were however many other executive staff members (e.g. Director of IT, Head of Library, HoDs of the Computer Science, Mathematics and Statistics, e.t.c.) and one of them stood in for the VC.

Posseng_Programme_1

Posseng_Programme_1

Posseng_Programme_2

Posseng_Programme_2

There were over 30 participants; they were a mix of academics in and outside RUN (e.g. there were academics from the Ajayi Crowther University, University of Lagos, e.t.c.), students, librarians and some technical support staff members. We got a cool venue for the event; it was one of the software laboratories in the Department of Computer Science. The opening event was brief and concise. During my opening note, I told everyone why all Mozilla contributors that I contacted would not come. It was a pity but I promised that I would be wearing the three hats – an instructor/co-ordinator, evangelist and developer. And finally, we took some photos before the executive members of the school departed.

POSSE NIGERIA@RUN

POSSE NIGERIA@RUN

Not long after, the POSSE NG technical session got started. It didn’t take a long time before they got productively lost. They were shown the ToS IRC channel, planet and website. The #TeachingOpenSource IRC channel and the twitter handle #POSSNIG were our choice communication tools. You can join or follow us using any of tools for updates. After taking about TOS, I explained the terms – Open Source, Open Content and Open Standard – to them. I also showed them how to get concise information about any OS project (using Ohloh and Openhatch). The websites show the number of contributors, commits and programming languages used in a project. They were also exposed to some of the OSS licenses.

Given that a week bootcamp is now condensed into two days, there was little or no break as the session lasted for 8hours. Not all the participants could stay up that long; I saw quite a number of them dozing off. There were just so many to show them; I was right, when I introduced myself by saying “…. I am interested in OS because it shows us how things should be done.” We got our hands dirty by building boot2gecko (the FirefoxOS phone Operating System), using bugzilla to file a bug and diving into the core of the B2G codebase (in order to see the various languages used in it).

It would be good to give some feedback on the participants. I was highly impressed by the enthusiasm shown by all of them let alone the three noticeable geeks that seemed to know all I was talking about. The students and their instructors were very engaging, which shown we got the right crop of attendees into POSSE NG.

Finally, there were given an assignment, which was due the following morning. And we ended the day’s session sharing gifts.

 

 

Comments

Pre POSSE NIGERIA

POSSE NG will be starting in the next 24hrs and will be run by me with support from Samuel. Being the only facilitator, I have got to play the role of an Open Source & Technology Evangelist, developer and co-ordinator. I have had little time to prepare for the event since I first needed to complete any workplace-related tasks. I ensured that I brainstorm about the event on the airplane to Nigeria. The trip was an interesting one as I had a short encountered with the South African border control again. Here is the first encounter. This time around, the controller, met an educated/PAN African, who won’t present his ID book but only his passport because he doesn’t think there should be borders separating African countries.

The controller was a beautiful but ignorant lady, who had not travelled out of South Africa and never thought that Africa should be a country (in addition to being a continent like Australia). It should be a country comprising of 51 states (not countries). She’s also arrogant. She had asked me if I married a Xhosa woman like other Nigerians do in South Africa. I guess she saw my wedding ring. I never thought twice before rhetorically responding to her by saying why would I marry a South African woman. The confrontation was not going to end anytime soon and I was conscious of the long queue behind me; so, I asked her if I could leave. I later turned to drop her my business card, which I wrote on its back.

Before telling you what I wrote, I must say that I have no reservation for interracial marriages. I wholeheartedly support it; and sometime ago, I tweeted about South African women fighting their government  regarding the way they and their Nigerian husbands are being treated.. Anyway, I am going to continue talking about my experience with the controller another time. In another related development, I met some Nigerians on board, who told me they had just been deported for the various reasons.It was so mean of the SA border control to deport a Nigerian because his vaccination book does show when he got it. The day & month but not the year were written; and the vaccination is no longer administered in SA, at least the passenger(s) could have processed it there (again). That is just of the reasons that 10 or more Nigerians, where deported. I am now waiting to see how Nigeria will respond. The two countries have been in the news few months ago for deporting each other’s citizens. This is just the reason I always say Africans (most notably their governments) are myopic.

At the end of it all, I got to Lagos and needed to find my way to one of the venues for POSSE NG (Redeemer’s University, Lagos). It was a very tiring trip, which left me to head for bed at the slightest opportunity. I trust I would be full of life tomorrow for the day one of POSSE NG. I can’t wait for it.

 

Updated: Apr. 11, 2014 {Changed the words “his permit” to “his ID book but only his passport”}

Comments (1)

Getting More Out of the IETF for Africans

Anyone reading my blog posts would likely have seen that I recently started to dump email correspondence on the blog. Some parts of these emails (or probably the whole correspondence) should remain confidential. I would agree with anyone; and it’s possible that some of the correspondents might not be comfortable seeing their messages on the Internet.

When there is a need for a change, and all parties  involved dearly want the change, it is necessary to make every information that can help improve the situation available to every member of the parties. To be specific, I, like some other people around the globe, want more contributions to the IETF from Africa. And as every next IETF meeting draws nearer, knowledge/domain-specific experts/industry players/scholars across the globe post on various mailing lists news about the upcoming meeting and the need for remote participation (for those that cannot attend the meeting). One of such mailing lists is the Afrinic mailing list. I am subscribed to the mailing list sometie ago. Few days ago, I saw a post about  the ongoing IETF89 meeting in London.

I kept tabs on the correspondence and saw that the correspondents were also asking themselves where/how/why is Africa under-represented, not meaningfully contributing or getting valuable results from the IETF meetings. I pointed them at some of my efforts at the IETF88 in Vancouver. And I later found that one or more people had expressed their concerns in one of the IETF mailing lists like I did.

Some of the correspondents have now asked me for the outcome of my efforts. Hence, I thought it would be wise to put everything out there on the Internet. Hopefully, someone somewhere somehow will see these threads and help give all our efforts a further push. Below is my interaction with some of the key ISOC members that drive the IETF. Good luck Africa and the other emerging economies. By the way, the Latin America region is highly visible at the IETF unlike Africa.

 

 

 

———- Original Message ———-
From: “Michael Adeyeye, PhD”
To: Ray Pelletier
Cc: Richard Barnes, Alexa Morris, Steve Conte
Date: 18 December 2013 at 06:32
Subject: Re: List of IETF Participants from Africa

Hi Ray,
You are perfectly right. Please see inline.

> On 16 December 2013 at 16:51 Ray Pelletier wrote:
>
>
> Michael
>
> I want to make sure I understand your request.
>
> You would like a mailing list created by the IETF for use to discuss IETF matters among IETFers from Africa, like IETF-Africa@ietf.org
>
> You would like to send an email to Africans who have attended IETF meetings anytime over the last 5 – 10 years.
>
> We can set up such a mail list with you as Administrator.
> We do not give out email addresses. However, we would be willing to send an email drafted by you to those we can identify from our IETF
> attendance list as having selected a country in Africa for some number of years.

I am not too sure how this would work. If you say you won’t be able to give out their email addresses, what addresses will be in the mailing list?

The mailing list also needs to be updated as newcomers from Africa attend the IETF meetings. Preferably, the newcomers need to be added before “the meeting” comes up.

>
> Do I understand you correctly? Is there more, or less?

>
> Ray
> IAD
>
>

———- Original Message ———-
From: “Michael Adeyeye, PhD”
To: Richard Barnes, Ray Pelletier
Cc: Steve Conte
Date: 16 December 2013 at 08:52
Subject: Re: List of IETF Participants from Africa

Thanks Richard. And apologies for not acknowledging receipt of your emails. I had been away for sometime. I just returned back from Nigeria.

> On 09 December 2013 at 21:58 Richard Barnes wrote:
>
>
> Hey Michael,
>
> I’m forwarding you over to Ray Pelletier, who is the Administrative
> Director for the IETF. He can help you get a message to the folks on
> your list. If you can provide him with a message (e.g., an invitation
> to join a mailing list), he can forward it to the group you’re
> interested in.
>
> Hope this helps,
> –Richard

———- Original Message ———-
From: “Michael Adeyeye, PhD”
To: Steve Conte
Date: 26 November 2013 at 21:25
Subject: Re: List of IETF Participants from Africa

Hi STeve and Richard,
Attached is a list containing attendees of the IETF meetings for the past 5-7yrs. Is it possible to get their email addresses from the secretariat?
The information is need by the task force committee.

Regards.

On 14 November 2013 at 16:02 Steve Conte wrote:

Hi Michael,

The IETF website has past meeting proceedings, which include the plenary slides, that usually have participant data.  This can be found here:

http://www.fredmiranda.com/reviews/showproduct.php?product=362

However, one HUGE thing to keep in mind.. IETF meetings happen three times a year (approximately 15 days).  The Working Group mailing lists happen 365 days a year.  Producing statistics about meeting attendance is one thing, but I don’t feel it would really capture the full participation of a specific region.

As for getting that kind of data, I don’t know if there’s a way to do so, since participating in the IETF process only requires that you have a functional email address.

Steve

—–
Steve Conte
Internet Leadership Programme
The Internet Society

From:
Reply-To: “Michael Adeyeye, Ph.D”
Date: Thursday, November 14, 2013 12:29 AM
To: Steve Conte
Subject: List of IETF Participants from Africa

Hi Steve and Richard,
I don’t know who can help me get a list of the IETF participants from Africa for the last 5-10years.

We (the IETF African taskforce) would like to get their contact details. We will also need you to help set-up a mailing list that we can use to communicate with one another. Please send me the credentials for the mailing list so that I can administer it.

Regards.

———- Original Message ———-
From: “Michael Adeyeye, Ph.D”
To: Steve Conte,
Date: 14 November 2013 at 09:29
Subject: List of IETF Participants from Africa

Hi Steve and Richard,
I don’t know who can help me get a list of the IETF participants from Africa for the last 5-10years.

We (the IETF African taskforce) would like to get their contact details. We will also need you to help set-up a mailing list that we can use to communicate with one another. Please send me the credentials for the mailing list so that I can administer it.

Regards.

———- Original Message ———-
From: “Michael Adeyeye, Ph.D”
To: Christian O’Flaherty, Arturo Servin, Michuki Mwangi
Cc: “Alvaro Retana (aretana)”
Date: 13 November 2013 at 18:11
Subject: Re: [ericas] AFRICANs @ the IETF 88

Please reconfirm.

———- Original Message ———-
From: “Michael Adeyeye, Ph.D”
To: Arturo Servin, Christian O’Flaherty, Michuki Mwangi
Cc: “Alvaro Retana (aretana)”
Date: 13 November 2013 at 18:08
Subject: Re: [ericas] AFRICANs @ the IETF 88

H Everyone,
i thought the times were  PM (post meridiem) here, which would be AM in the west.
I just checked and saw that there was a mistake. I have now changed the times. The should now be “appropriate.”

Thank you for the understanding.

Regards,
Michael.

> On 13 November 2013 at 14:37 Christian O’Flaherty wrote:
>
>
> Hi Michael,
>
> Due to timezone differences the current suggestions are not appropriate
> for us. Could you please add more options in the 10AM-10PM UTC range?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Christian O’Flaherty -
> Regional Development – Internet Society
>
>
>
>
> On 11/13/13 11:21 AM, “Arturo Servin” wrote:
>
> >
> > Done!
> >
> >.as
> >
> >
> >On 11/13/13, 5:03 AM, Christian O’Flaherty wrote:
> >> Adding Michuki and Arturo to the poll.
> >>
> >> http://doodle.com/i5m2chka3wg4y5qg
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> Christian
> >>
> >>
> >> On 11/13/13 5:46 AM, “Michael Adeyeye, Ph.D” wrote:
> >>
> >>> When will be convenient for us to talk?
> >>> http://doodle.com/i5m2chka3wg4y5qg
> >>> My skype id is “micadeyeye”
> >>>
> >>> Please forward the URL to anyone else you think we should get involved.
> >>>
> >>> Thanks.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> On 07 November 2013 at 16:14 “Alvaro Retana (aretana)”
> >>> wrote:
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Michael:
> >>>
> >>> Hi!
> >>>
> >>> I’m adding Christian from the Internet Society who has been part of the
> >>> process in LATAM too. I believe he’s still in Vancouver.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> I am traveling in Mexico this week. Let’s try and set up a call
> >>>sometime
> >>> next week. Let me know a couple of days/times that would work for you.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Alvaro.
> >>>
> >>> On 11/7/13 8:52 AM, “Michael Adeyeye, Ph.D” <
> >>> wrote:
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Please go ahead. I wish you were still around though. We can arrange a
> >>> chat too.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> On 07 November 2013 at 15:45 “Alvaro Retana (aretana)” <
> >>> wrote:
> >>>
> >>> Michael:
> >>>
> >>> Hi! How are you?
> >>>
> >>> I am not African..and already had to leave Vancouver.. :-(
> >>>
> >>> In Latin America we (LACNOG) started a similar effort to increase
> >>> participation from persons in the region. We formed a task force
> >>>(which
> >>> I chair) and have been doing some activities. If interested, I would
> >>>be
> >>> happy to set out some time to talk about
> >>> the experience and what we’ve one.
> >>>
> >>> Regards,
> >>>
> >>> Alvaro.
> >>>
> >>> On 11/7/13 7:54 AM, “Michael Adeyeye, Ph.D” <
> >>> wrote:
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Is
> >>> it possible for us to meet for a brief meeting today or tomorrow
> >>>(before
> >>> we all depart to our various destinations)?
> >>>
> >>> I would be interested
> >>> in talking to you all on how we can improve on our representation and
> >>> contributions to the IETF. It would also be good to discuss how we can
> >>> help develop the continent via this network.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >
>
>

———- Original Message ———-
From: “Michael Adeyeye, Ph.D”
To: “Alvaro Retana (aretana)”
Cc: Christian O’Flaherty
Date: 13 November 2013 at 08:46
Subject: Re: [ericas] AFRICANs @ the IETF 88

When will be convenient for us to talk?

http://doodle.com/i5m2chka3wg4y5qg

My skype id is “micadeyeye”

Please forward the URL to anyone else you think we should get involved.

Thanks.

On 07 November 2013 at 16:14 “Alvaro Retana (aretana)” wrote:

Michael:

Hi!

I’m adding Christian from the Internet Society who has been part of the process in LATAM too.  I believe he’s still in Vancouver.

I am traveling in Mexico this week.  Let’s try and set up a call sometime next week.  Let me know a couple of days/times that would work for you.

Alvaro.

On 11/7/13 8:52 AM, “Michael Adeyeye, Ph.D” wrote:

Please go ahead. I wish you were still around though. We can arrange a chat too.

On 07 November 2013 at 15:45 “Alvaro Retana (aretana)” wrote:

Michael:

Hi!  How are you?

I am not African..and already had to leave Vancouver..  :-(

In Latin America we (LACNOG) started a similar effort to increase participation from persons in the region.  We formed a task force (which I chair) and have been doing some activities.  If interested, I would be happy to set out some time to talk about the experience and what we’ve one.

Regards,

Alvaro.

On 11/7/13 7:54 AM, “Michael Adeyeye, Ph.D” wrote:

Is it possible for us to meet for a brief meeting today or tomorrow (before we all depart to our various destinations)?

I would be interested in talking to you all on how we can improve on our representation and contributions to the IETF. It would also be good to discuss how we can help develop the continent via this network.

———- Original Message ———-
From: “Michael Adeyeye, Ph.D”
To: Richard Barnes <richard.barnes@gmail.com>
Date: 11 November 2013 at 08:09
Subject: Re: [88attendees] AFRICANs @ the IETF 88

HI Richard,
Thanks a million for this note. I wrote down pretty much the same thing.

I will be getting in touch w.r.t the next course of action soonest.

Regards.

> On 08 November 2013 at 19:21 Richard Barnes wrote:
>
>
> Hey Michael,
>
> Thanks for organizing. I thought it was a really good meeting, and I
> hope it succeeds in building some momentum. My notes for the session
> are below, in case they’re helpful.
>
> I really do think it’s important to get something concrete, whether
> that’s an I-D (or many I-Ds!) or a BoF, or a statement about why the
> IETF matters to ICT professionals. It’s important to build community
> and be supportive of people, but in my experience, you really need
> some concrete objectives in order to keep people interested.
>
> Please let me know if there’s *anything* I can do to help.
>
> Best,
> –Richard
>
>
> — Languages: how to accommodate
> — translation in meetings
> — newcomers in more languages
> — academics
> — DANE / DNS-based security
> — Constrained networks
> — LMAP reviews?
> — mentorship / responsiveness
> — scarcity of skilled people
> — Mesh networks: Village telco in ZA
> — where are the past fellows?
> — organize an IETF Africa group?
> — there’s a South American one
> — present at AfNOG?
> — like RIPE regional meetings?
> — awareness raising
> — 1 pager on what the IETF is, why it matters
> — IETF African Task Force: set up mailing list, use to publicize
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Fri, Nov 8, 2013 at 8:34 AM, Michael Adeyeye, Ph.D
> wrote:
> > Hi Everyone,
> > Kensington is now booked for our meeting.
> > It’s starting at 9am; and please come by to share your experience and
> > thoughts.
> >
> > Regards.
> >
> >
> >
> > On 08 November 2013 at 11:53 “Michael Adeyeye, Ph.D” wrote:
> >
> > Many thanks goes to Spencer Dawkins and Fred Baker for the non-exhaustive
> > list of things we should also look into. They are highly informative.
> >
> >
> > There are just so much things to talk about that time wouldn’t permit us to
> > do this morning.
> >
> >
> > Parts of the Agenda:::
> > 1. Contributing to the IETF: The IETF 88 just showed many of us how ideas
> > are turned into standards. Wouldn’t it be good to see (native) African names
> > on an RFC, IAB, WG-chairs, e.t.c.? One way of doing so is by having a
> > “fighting spirit” with continuous mentorship/support from the IETF members &
> > various bodies. Just before the term “WebRTC or RTCWeb” came into the
> > limelight in 2011 (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WebRTC), someone from
> > Africa had earlier seen a need for it
> > (http://conferences.sigcomm.org/co-next/2007/papers/studentabstracts/paper23.pdf).
> > It was in 2007 that the idea first came up and a proof of concept was later
> > developed (http://bit.ly/R3SFtc). Today, the RTCWeb Working Group is now
> > standardizing it. It started out as an application (OR an idea) -i.e.
> > getting SIP into browsers for browser-to-browser communication. I am certain
> > that there are some many other ideas like that coming out of Africa. We now
> > need to push ourselves further to get our names there.
> >
> > 2. Getting more people involved: AT the moment, over ten people (students,
> > academics, e.t.c.) from different African countries have asked me how they
> > can get involved in the IETF activities. SOme other IETF 88 fellows from the
> > continent have also suggested that we talk about ways of sharing our
> > experiences. The situation is not peculiar to Africa. Many thanks to the
> > task force from South America that now wants to guide us on possible
> > ways/solutions.
> >
> > 3. Re-imaging the world’s view about Africa: Yes, I used the word
> > “re-image.” I am referring to the computing concept from “virtual images.”
> > What people hear/see about the continent (mostly negative things) is
> > different from what they see, when the visit (some parts of) the continent.
> > How do we get the continent to earn its own respect like Asia and South
> > America? (Ref -
> > http://www.siliconafrica.com/it-takes-a-network-to-beat-a-network/)
> >
> >
> > Please feel free to dump your thoughts as you’ve been doing…..
> >
> > Regards.
> >
> >
> >> On 08 November 2013 at 08:30 Spencer Dawkins
> >> wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >> On 11/7/2013 8:24 PM, Fred Baker (fred) wrote:
> >> > On Nov 7, 2013, at 3:07 AM, “Michael Adeyeye, Ph.D”
> >> > wrote:
> >> >> I would be interested in talking to you all on how we can improve on
> >> >> our representation and contributions to the IETF. It would also be good to
> >> >> discuss how we can help develop the continent via this network.
> >> > An important consideration in this is that while your presence in
> >> > meetings is valuable, your presence on mailing lists is also valuable and
> >> > comparatively inexpensive. As a first step, you might consider looking
> >> > through the set of drafts labeled draft-ietf-*.txt, which is to say “working
> >> > group drafts”. Their working group will generally be the third word, like
> >> > draft-ietf-ospf or draft-ietf-v6ops. Access them online, and, if they
> >> > interest you, comment on them. The most interesting comments will be those
> >> > that improve them in some way – identify issues and suggest text. That will
> >> > get african viewpoints into discussions regarding current work product.
> >> >
> >> > BTW, the same goes for south americans and anyone else that feels
> >> > under-represented. Get involved on mailing lists.
> >> >
> >> > Daily news can be found at https://www.ietf.org, and specifically
> >> > http://tools.ietf.org/dailydose/. It takes a minute to look at it, and from
> >> > time to time you may find something of interest to comment on. You can also
> >> > go to http://tools.ietf.org/html/.
> >> >
> >> > If you need guidance regarding a given working group, the obvious people
> >> > to get it from are the chairs, which you can reach by emailing the
> >> > -chairs@tools.ietf.org list for the working group. For example, if you want
> >> > to reach the v6ops chairs, email v6ops-chairs@tools.ietf.org. For a list of
> >> > the working groups and access to their charters and their mailing list
> >> > membership processes, go to http://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/.
> >> >
> >> > The next step might include writing your own drafts and submitting them
> >> > for discussion. But you don’t need to rush into that; get a sense of what’s
> >> > going on and then contribute to it.
> >>
> >> I agree with Fred’s suggestions, and wanted to mention a couple of other
> >> things …
> >>
> >> If during your checking around you find problems with protocols we’re
> >> working on that don’t work in your particular country or environment,
> >> please tell us.
> >>
> >> I’m remembering (possibly dreaming, it’s been a long week) that GeoPriv
> >> was rolling along when someone somewhere in Asia pointed out that in
> >> their country, and perhaps only in their country, some civic addresses
> >> included *alleys*, and asked how these addresses should be encoded. If
> >> we hadn’t heard from participants from that country, we wouldn’t have
> >> known until someone tried to deploy products in that country
> >> (inconveniently late for a standards discussion).
> >>
> >> The TSV area has been looking at a tunneling/compression/multiplexing
> >> proposal (details at http://www.ietf.org/proceedings/87/tcmtf.html, and
> >> this is likely to pop back up at IETF 89 in London, if the BOF
> >> requestors ask for that). It turns out that we got some support from
> >> African participants who find it fits their connectivity to the rest of
> >> the Internet.
> >>
> >> You might also check out the discussions to date on the diversity
> >> mailing list, where people are doing things like asking what it would
> >> take to set up regional meetings for folks who can’t travel to an IETF
> >> meeting, so that more people can engage and contribute. See
> >> http://www.ietf.org/mail-archive/web/diversity/current/maillist.html for
> >> the archive.
> >>
> >> If you’re thinking about how to help people back home who weren’t able
> >> to attend, you might also make use of training materials from the Sunday
> >> tutorials (for instance, the IETF 87 Newcomer’s Training is at
> >> http://www.ietf.org/proceedings/87/slides/slides-87-edu-newcomers-4.pdf
> >> – I just reported that the IETF 88 version returned a 404/not found).
> >> These aren’t all process tutorials, either – for instance, if people
> >> care about realtime applications and infrastructure,
> >> http://www.ietf.org/proceedings/88/slides/slides-88-edu-introtorai-0.pdf
> >> would be helpful.
> >>
> >> I hope this helps you and your colleagues contribute effectively to the
> >> IETF.
> >>
> >> Spencer, in this case, writing as an AD
> >>
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > 88attendees mailing list
> > 88attendees@ietf.org
> > https://www.ietf.org/mailman/listinfo/88attendees
> >
>

———- Original Message ———-
From: “Michael Adeyeye, Ph.D”
To: Spencer Dawkins, “Fred Baker (fred)”
Cc: “88attendees@ietf.org” <88attendees@ietf.org>
Date: 08 November 2013 at 17:34
Subject: Re: [88attendees] AFRICANs @ the IETF 88

Hi Everyone,
Kensington is now booked for our meeting.
It’s starting at 9am; and please come by to share your experience and thoughts.

Regards.

———- Original Message ———-
From: “Michael Adeyeye, Ph.D”
To: Richard Barnes
Date: 08 November 2013 at 02:34
Subject: Re: [88attendees] AFRICANs @ the IETF 88

Please come!

> On 07 November 2013 at 16:09 Richard Barnes <richard.barnes@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
> Hey guys,
>
> If it would be helpful to have an IESG member there, please let me
> know. I think it’s great that you guys are working on this, and I
> would be glad provide any help I can.
>
> –Richard
>
> On Thu, Nov 7, 2013 at 5:45 AM, Adama dembélé wrote:
> > Hi Adeye,
> > it is a good Idea, I am available this morning and tomorrow after 13H…
> > Wainting for your details…
> > Regards
> > ————————————————————————
> >
> > ________________________________
> > De : “Michael Adeyeye, Ph.D”
> > À : 88attendees@ietf.org
> > Envoyé le : Jeudi 7 novembre 2013 3h07
> > Objet : [88attendees] AFRICANs @ the IETF 88
> >
> >
> > Hi The African folks@IETF 88,
> > Is it possible for us to meet for a brief meeting today or tomorrow (before
> > we all depart to our various destinations)?
> >
> > I would be interested in talking to you all on how we can improve on our
> > representation and contributions to the IETF. It would also be good to
> > discuss how we can help develop the continent via this network.
> >
> > Regards,
> > Michael
> >
> >
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > 88attendees mailing list
> > 88attendees@ietf.org
> > https://www.ietf.org/mailman/listinfo/88attendees
> >
> >
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > 88attendees mailing list
> > 88attendees@ietf.org
> > https://www.ietf.org/mailman/listinfo/88attendees
> >
>

———- Original Message ———-
From: “Michael Adeyeye, Ph.D”
To: Paul M, Ed Pascoe
Cc: Adama dembélé, “Edwin A. Opare”, “88attendees@ietf.org” <88attendees@ietf.org>
Date: 08 November 2013 at 01:52
Subject: Re: [88attendees] AFRICANs @ the IETF 88

Thanks Guys,
So, we will all be meeting as follows:
Venue: the Kensington room at the fourth floor
Time: 9am

Agenda:
- Where do we go from HERE?

Regards.

On 08 November 2013 at 00:35 Ed Pascoe wrote:

Hi.

Straight after the Fellows wrap up would work for me as well.

Ed.

On Thu, Nov 7, 2013 at 2:58 PM, Paul M wrote:
Dear Michael, Adama et al,

We could schedule a meet up tomorrow morning right after the ISOC Fellows wrap up which will be taking place from 8:00 – 8:45 am at the Kensington room at the fourth floor. If all of you are present we could meet right after the wrap up perhaps in the same room.

Kindest Regards,

Paul M

On 7/11/2013, at 5:45 am, Adama dembélé wrote:

Hi Adeye,
it is a good Idea, I am available this morning and tomorrow after 13H…
Wainting for your details…
Regards
————————————————————————

De : “Michael Adeyeye, Ph.D”
À : 88attendees@ietf.org
Envoyé le : Jeudi 7 novembre 2013 3h07
Objet : [88attendees] AFRICANs @ the IETF 88

Hi The African folks@IETF 88,
Is it possible for us to meet for a brief meeting today or tomorrow (before we all depart to our various destinations)?

I would be interested in talking to you all on how we can improve on our representation and contributions to the IETF. It would also be good to discuss how we can help develop the continent via this network.

Regards,
Michael

_______________________________________________
88attendees mailing list
88attendees@ietf.org

https://www.ietf.org/mailman/listinfo/88attendees

_______________________________________________
88attendees mailing list
88attendees@ietf.org

https://www.ietf.org/mailman/listinfo/88attendees

_______________________________________________
88attendees mailing list
88attendees@ietf.org

https://www.ietf.org/mailman/listinfo/88attendees

———- Original Message ———-
From: “Michael Adeyeye, Ph.D”
To: 88attendees@ietf.org,ericas@irtf.org
Date: 07 November 2013 at 12:07
Subject: AFRICANs @ the IETF 88

Hi The African folks@IETF 88,
Is it possible for us to meet for a brief meeting today or tomorrow (before we all depart to our various destinations)?

I would be interested in talking to you all on how we can improve on our representation and contributions to the IETF. It would also be good to discuss how we can help develop the continent via this network.

Regards,
Michael

Comments (2)

Our Draft (MSRP over WebRTC data channels) @ the IETF89

Our draft (MSRP over WebRTC data channels) has now got a further push at the IETF. As we were advised to take it (from the dispatch WG) to the MMUSIC working group  at the IETF88 in Vancouver, we have now done so.

An update on the work will be presented at the MMUSIC WG session (http://www.ietf.org/proceedings/89/agenda/agenda-89-mmusic) on Thursday at 10:30-10:50am. If you are attending the IETF89 in London, kindly come join us at the Buckingham room. And if you can’t come, a remote participation is welcome. Please visit http://ietf89.conf.meetecho.com/.

Comments

ISOC: A Funder That Helps Keep Africa in Check

See below  for  the reasons ISOC has refused to support our project titled “eSchool Nigeria (Linking Secondary Schools Using Wireless Mesh Network and TV White Space”.  This is about the fourth or fifth time our proposals will be turned down. Here is another of such reasons they gave when turning down one of our previous proposals. I have checked all the projects they eventually approved (for 2013) and I am shocked, like I was the other time, by the kind of projects in Africa  that they will be supporting for the year 2013/2014.  I would advise you read the correspondence bottom up if you want to understand the thread.

.——– Original Message ——–
Subject: Re: Community Grants Programme – notification
Date: Fri, 29 Nov 2013 08:17:47 +0200
From: Michael Adeyeye <micadeyeye@ngportal.com>
To: Ilda Simao <simao@isoc.org>
CC: Otunte Otueneh <otuenehoj@danelec-ltd.com>, “gmassari@danelec-ltd.com” <gmassari@danelec-ltd.com>, “oruye@isocnig.org.ng” <oruye@isocnig.org.ng>, “secretary@isocnig.org.ng” <secretary@isocnig.org.ng>, “projects@isoc.org” <projects@isoc.org>, Christine Saegesser <saegesser@isoc.org>, Dawit Bekele <bekele@isoc.org>, Olufade ONIFADE <olufadeo@gmail.com>
Hi Ilda,
Thank you for the email. And it is indeed unfortunate that the selection
committee will AGAIN turn down our application (the third application!).

We are extremely shocked that the below are the reasons why the
application was turned down. The team never contacted us for some
additional information w.r.t. their concerns. They had rather asked some
questions on membership status & confirmed buy-in from the local ISOC in
NIgeria (which are relatively the same). We would have expected the team
to raise the below questions, when they had earlier contacted us, rather
than using them as reasons to turn down the application (i.e. a weapon).

We are putting it forward to the team to clearly look over the proposal
again; we never stated that TVWS would be the ONLY way by which we will
interconnect the school. And we would have been able to get support
letters from the local schools if requested.

We trust the team knows what it is doing by choosing not to fund this
kind of project, just like it did to the previous ones -

http://www.ngportal.com/micadeyeye/index.php/2012/12/14/withdrawing-from-isoc/.

The decision is not unconnected to this interesting quote ".....There is
a lesson here for African countries: Don’t expect other nations to
transfer their technology and knowledge to you though humanitarian
programs. It won’t happen." And it would be good you all read the entire
post here -

http://www.siliconafrica.com/nothing-new-china-goes-to-learn-and-steal-like-europe-and-america/

Regards.
Michael.

On 28/11/13 23:19, Ilda Simao wrote: > Dear Michael, > > Thank you for your recent Community Grants Programme application. > > After careful consideration of your project, the Selection Committee has > unfortunately decided not to fund your application. > > Although, the Committee recognizes the value of the project proposal, some > concerns were raised, listed below: > > > - TV white space still encounters some issues in the region, > - Permission is needed from the regulators to use the spectrum and > needs to be demonstrated > - Buy-in from local schools needs to be confirmed with a letter of > support > > > Therefore, the Committee suggest that re-apply next round taking in > consideration this aspects. > > Once again, thank you for your time and support for the Internet Society¹s > mission and goals. > > Best wishes, > > Ilda > > > ==================================== > Ilda Simao > Community Grants Coordinator > Internet Society > Website: www.InternetSociety.org > > > > >

——– Original Message ——–

Subject: Re: Community Grants Proposal – Nigeria Chapter Application
Date: Fri, 08 Nov 2013 02:06:36 +0200
From: Michael Adeyeye <micadeyeye@ngportal.com>
To: Otunte Otueneh <otuenehoj@danelec-ltd.com>
CC: ‘Ilda Simao’ <simao@isoc.org>, gmassari@danelec-ltd.com, oruye@isocnig.org.ng, secretary@isocnig.org.ng, ‘Projects Grants Committee’ <projects@isoc.org>, ‘Christine Saegesser’ <saegesser@isoc.org>, ‘Dawit Bekele’ <bekele@isoc.org>, Olufade ONIFADE <olufadeo@gmail.com>

——– Original Message ——–
Subject:     Re: Community Grants Proposal – Nigeria Chapter Application
Date:     Thu, 7 Nov 2013 18:43:34 +0100
From:     Olufade ONIFADE <olufadeo@gmail.com>
To:     Michael Adeyeye <micadeyeye@ngportal.com>

Hi Mic,
I’ve been following the trend of discussion as being discussed.
I don’t understand the part that I didn’t register. I remembered vividly that I did that.
As regards monitoring, let them know I am on ground and will effectively monitor the project.
Meanwhile, what’s happening in Canada?
Bridge me up.
Regards and Shallom

Sent from my iPhone
Olufade F. W. ONIFADE (Ph.D.)

On Nov 5, 2013, at 7:01 PM, Michael Adeyeye <micadeyeye@ngportal.com> wrote:

> FYA; I was also asked to answer some questions few days/weeks ago.

On 07/11/13 14:04, Otunte Otueneh wrote:

Dear Ilda,

 

Thank you for the clarification.

 

Kind regards,

 

Otunte Otueneh

 

 

From: Ilda Simao [mailto:simao@isoc.org]
Sent: Thursday, November 07, 2013 12:51 PM
To: Otunte Otueneh; gmassari@danelec-ltd.com; oruye@isocnig.org.ng; secretary@isocnig.org.ng
Cc: micadeyeye@ngportal.com; ‘Projects Grants Committee’; Christine Saegesser; Dawit Bekele
Subject: Re: Community Grants Proposal – Nigeria Chapter Application

 

Dear Otunte,

 

Thank you for your message. The confirmation needs to come from the Chapter officers.

 

The applicant, in this case Dr. Michael Adeyeye, is copied for information.

 

Thank you.

 

Ilda

 

From: Otunte Otueneh <otuenehoj@danelec-ltd.com>
Date: Thursday, November 7, 2013 12:44 PM
To: Ilda Simao <simao@isoc.org>, “gmassari@danelec-ltd.com” <gmassari@danelec-ltd.com>, “oruye@isocnig.org.ng” <oruye@isocnig.org.ng>, “secretary@isocnig.org.ng” <secretary@isocnig.org.ng>
Cc: micadeyeye@ngportal.com” <micadeyeye@ngportal.com>, ‘Projects Grants Committee’ <projects@isoc.org>, Christine Saegesser <saegesser@isoc.org>, Dawit Bekele <bekele@isoc.org>
Subject: RE: Community Grants Proposal – Nigeria Chapter Application

 

Dear Ilda,

 

Good day.

 

Regarding the information you need from your email, is it directed to the Chapter officers or Dr. Michael Adeyeye?

I ask because your email points to the Chapter Officers.

 

Kind regards,

 

Otunte Otueneh

 

 

From: Ilda Simao [mailto:simao@isoc.org]
Sent: Tuesday, November 05, 2013 6:45 PM
To: gmassari@danelec-ltd.com; oruye@isocnig.org.ng; secretary@isocnig.org.ng; otuenehoj@danelec-ltd.com
Cc: micadeyeye@ngportal.com; Projects Grants Committee; Christine Saegesser; Dawit Bekele
Subject: Community Grants Proposal – Nigeria Chapter Application

 

Dear Chapter Officers,

 

Following your recent application to the Community Grants Programme with proposal “eSchool Nigeria (Linking Secondary Schools Using Wireless Mesh Network and TV White Space” submitted by Dr. Michael Adeyeye, we would like you to confirm the support of the Chapter in this project.

 

If possible, please list the name of chapter members involved in the project and their respective roles. If the Chapter is only supporting the application, please indicate the level of implication and support.

 

Note that this is a formality to all applications received.

 

Thank you for your collaboration,

 

Ilda Simao

Community Grants Coordinator

Internet Society

 

 

 

 

 

——– Original Message ——–

Subject: Re: Community Grants Proposal – Nigeria Chapter Application
Date: Thu, 07 Nov 2013 16:29:12 +0200
From: Michael Adeyeye <micadeyeye@ngportal.com>
To: Otunte Otueneh <otuenehoj@danelec-ltd.com>
CC: gmassari@danelec-ltd.com, oruye@isocnig.org.ng, secretary@isocnig.org.ng, Olufade ONIFADE <olufadeo@gmail.com>
Hi Mr. Otueneh,
The ISOC was right by checking with the local chapter(s). We also trust that you can be of help at some point. Perhaps, you have seen the proposal (sent from IS). The goal of the project is to provide a customized computer, network infrastructure and interconnect some of the secondary schools in a city (Ibadan) as a reference implementation.Here is an excerpt of the proposal – http://fpaste.org/52336/83363813/raw/. We are members of the IS, and I think Dr. Olufade is a sustaining member like me. We also have support from an equipment manufacturer to provide some mesh devices for the project.Regards.

On 07/11/13 14:12, Otunte Otueneh wrote:

Dear Dr. Michael Adeyeye,

 

Good day sir.

Regarding the community grant proposal you made as mentioned in the email sent by Ilda Simao, please provide an insight of the project to enable the chapter respond swiftly to the request from Internet Society.

 

Kind regards,

 

Otunte Otueneh

 

 

From: Ilda Simao [mailto:simao@isoc.org]
Sent: Thursday, November 07, 2013 12:51 PM
To: Otunte Otueneh; gmassari@danelec-ltd.com; oruye@isocnig.org.ng; secretary@isocnig.org.ng
Cc: micadeyeye@ngportal.com; ‘Projects Grants Committee’; Christine Saegesser; Dawit Bekele
Subject: Re: Community Grants Proposal – Nigeria Chapter Application

 

Dear Otunte,

 

Thank you for your message. The confirmation needs to come from the Chapter officers.

 

The applicant, in this case Dr. Michael Adeyeye, is copied for information.

 

Thank you.

 

Ilda

 

From: Otunte Otueneh <otuenehoj@danelec-ltd.com>
Date: Thursday, November 7, 2013 12:44 PM
To: Ilda Simao <simao@isoc.org>, “gmassari@danelec-ltd.com” <gmassari@danelec-ltd.com>, “oruye@isocnig.org.ng” <oruye@isocnig.org.ng>, “secretary@isocnig.org.ng” <secretary@isocnig.org.ng>
Cc: micadeyeye@ngportal.com” <micadeyeye@ngportal.com>, ‘Projects Grants Committee’ <projects@isoc.org>, Christine Saegesser <saegesser@isoc.org>, Dawit Bekele <bekele@isoc.org>
Subject: RE: Community Grants Proposal – Nigeria Chapter Application

 

Dear Ilda,

 

Good day.

 

Regarding the information you need from your email, is it directed to the Chapter officers or Dr. Michael Adeyeye?

I ask because your email points to the Chapter Officers.

 

Kind regards,

 

Otunte Otueneh

 

 

From: Ilda Simao [mailto:simao@isoc.org]
Sent: Tuesday, November 05, 2013 6:45 PM
To: gmassari@danelec-ltd.com; oruye@isocnig.org.ng; secretary@isocnig.org.ng; otuenehoj@danelec-ltd.com
Cc: micadeyeye@ngportal.com; Projects Grants Committee; Christine Saegesser; Dawit Bekele
Subject: Community Grants Proposal – Nigeria Chapter Application

 

Dear Chapter Officers,

 

Following your recent application to the Community Grants Programme with proposal “eSchool Nigeria (Linking Secondary Schools Using Wireless Mesh Network and TV White Space” submitted by Dr. Michael Adeyeye, we would like you to confirm the support of the Chapter in this project.

 

If possible, please list the name of chapter members involved in the project and their respective roles. If the Chapter is only supporting the application, please indicate the level of implication and support.

 

Note that this is a formality to all applications received.

 

Thank you for your collaboration,

 

Ilda Simao

Community Grants Coordinator

Internet Society

 

 

Comments (1)

Report on the ICTDEVers Get-together (15 October 2013)

Writer: Inès Joëlle NIRAGIRA

Introduction

ICTDEVers is a group of local ICT for DEVelopment practitioners and academics (students and their supervisors). They meet monthly to link up ICT4D projects and the people behind them. Through these get-togethers members get the opportunity to showcase what they are doing at their institutions and receive/offer help. Most attendees are currently postgraduate students from the University of Cape Town, University of Western Cape and Cape Peninsula University of Technology whose research area and interest are in ICT4D.  There was also an academic from the University of KwaZulu-Natal, who flew to Cape Town to attend the event.

ICTDEVers get-togethers take place once a month and meeting venues rotate amongst the three institutions (UCT, UWC and CPUT).

The October Get-together
The October get-together took place at Cape Peninsula University of Technology and was chaired by Dr. Michael Adeyeye. A crowd of over a forty enthusiastic people were gathered in the CENCRA room, like the previous ICTDevers meeting at CPUT

Attendees were given a chance to introduce themselves and briefly talk about their research projects and research interests.


On the Agenda

Dr Michael briefed everyone about an event that had recently taken place at CPUT: the Free Open Source and Hardware Symposium (FOSHS’13). Topics from the FOSHS’13 were to be discussed during the ICTDEVers meeting and members were invited to engage in discussions about the various topics namely:

  • Mozilla: The Firefox OS Tools and Apps
  • ZeroReserve: The Bitcoin Reserve Bank

 

Mozilla: The Firefox OS Tools and Apps

Brand new features recently implemented in Mozilla Firefox were presented, including an overview of the Firefox web developer tools, overview of the Firefox OS concept and design, the Firefox OS phone simulator (currently an add-on to the browser) and a physical demonstration of the phone. Discussion on how to deploy apps to the Firefox phone and the features included in it closed the presentation sessions.

Attendees got a chance to ask various questions about the gadget’s features and make comments on how well they think the phone fits in the smartphones’ current tight competition.

ZeroReserve: The Bitcoin Reserve Bank

“Very first time I hear of the word ‘Bitcoin’, am I the only one here? I wonder” exclaimed one of the supervisors as soon as the topic slide was displayed on the screen.

“I think having heard of ’Bitcoin’ before but I’m just wondering how is it related to the reason why we are here tonight” said another attendee.

“A completely new framework for understanding money, trade and financial management is embodied within the proposal of the ZeroReserve” Dr M Adeyeye presented. Whether Bitcoins are “open source money”, “soft money” or a virtual monetary representation of trade remains an open issue. Emphasis was placed on the possibility of using Bitcoins and setting up an organized ZeroReserve as to gain financial independence for African nations, especially from Western countries controlling the main monetary organizations in the world and from excessive dependence upon the strongest currencies in the world, such as the United States dollar and the European euro. “Currently, ZeroReserve is a prototype Linux application which does not require a banking gateway and implemented as a plug-in for Retroshare (an open source cross-platform, peer-to-peer, secure and decentralised communication platform)” he added.

Attendees were pretty intrigued by the topic and spent good amount of time discussing about it and asking questions on how known is the virtual currency on the African continent.

Closing and Socialising
Various matters including the ICTDEVers following meeting venue and the upcoming International Conference on ICT and Development to be held at UCT in December were discussed. Attendees were offered finger supper and drinks.


Comments (1)

Feedback from Students on FoSHS ’13

Title:
Free Open Source and Hardware Symposium (FOSHS ’13)

Objective:
Bringing together industry, developers, educators, the community and any other interested parties to discuss open source, open hardware, open web and academic/industry partnerships.

Location:
Department of Information Technology, Cape Peninsula University of Technology

Date:
October 10-11, 2013

Writers:
Ernesto Gomez Tagle G (Violetta Platar)
Abdel Wahid Sabre Ousman (Ben Sabre Fils)

I. Introduction and Expectations
Although it may be indeed too early to declare that open source software and hardware constitutes a trend in IT business and practice, it is clear that its relevance is increasing in recent times, with a large number of applications and solutions comprising these standards. By “open source” it should be understood that an application or device source code or design can be freely replicated and modified by others, provided that credit is given to the original designer and that the derivative work is openly available to modification as well. It does not necessarily mean that is free. Among others, some interesting issues regarding open source software and hardware that can be subject to discussion during the workshop are:

  • Open source businesses models. How organization may create or adequate their business models in order to produce revenue and therefore value for stakeholders.
  • Open APIs for open source cloud applications. Being cloud computing a trend in modern IT, having captured the attention of both researchers and practitioners alike, the impact of open source IT in cloud computing is relevant, especially through the use of open APIs.
  • Ways to connect developers in an open source development environment. From the definition of an “open source” technology, it comes that collaboration between developers or teams of developers is the main force nurturing innovation within the open source IT field. How this collaboration do actually take place and how communication improvement between developers enhance open source projects development remains an open topic.
  • The methodological aspects of open source development practice.
  • Legal framework and regulations regarding the open source experience.

Among the many topics of interest regarding open source IT, the expectation toward this symposium was to discuss those with colleges and speakers, so learning and contributing of useful information about recent developments in this active field were possible.

II. Featured Presentations

Translation Sprint on the Mozilla Projects (Arky)
The development platform and development tools for Mozilla Firefox were presented, including the Gecko Firefox rendering web browser engine. Firefox Nightly was introduced, and the installation of this distribution along with production Firefox was suggested through profile management. Presentations aimed to promote the creation of a Mozilla developer’s community in Cape Town. Also, the possibility of language customization of Firefox applications was discussed.

ZeroReserve: The Bitcoin Reserve Bank (Koch, Rudiger)
A completely new framework for understanding money, trade and financial management is embodied within the proposal of the ZeroReserve was presented. Whether Bitcoins are “open source money”, “soft money” or a virtual monetary representation of trade remains an open issue. Emphasis was placed on the possibility of using Bitcoins and setting up an organized ZeroReserve as to gain financial independence for African nations, especially from Western countries controlling the main monetary organizations in the world and from excessive dependence upon the strongest currencies in the world, such as the United States dollar and the European euro. Currently, ZeroReserve is a prototype Linux application which does not require a banking gateway and implemented as a plug-in for Retroshare (an open source cross-platform, peer-to-peer, secure and decentralised communication platform).

Mozilla: Firefox OS Tools and Apps (Arky)
Brand new features recently implemented in Mozilla Firefox were presented, including an overview of the Firefox web developer tools, overview of the Firefox OS concept and design, the Firefox OS phone simulator (currently an add-on to the browser) and a physical demonstration of the phone. Discussion on how to deploy apps to the Firefox phone and the features included in it closed the presentation sessions.

III. Learning Experience
From the Mozilla Firefox presentations, the most important learning experience dealt with the use of the Web Console to produce JavaScript code or as a debugger for HTML5 applications. Being Firefox the second more widely used web browser worldwide, the development tools for the platform are worth to review. Of particular interest was the great jump from the application development platform provided by the web browser to the new concept of “browser operating system” (Firefox OS), suitable for mobile phones. The use of this open source technology constitutes in our opinion, a step toward addressing the big challenge of ubiquitous connectivity built over data-rich open source mobile services, comprising not only the apps, but the mobile OS and even the hardware.
Also, we found useful the comparison between the web development tools provided by Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox, so advantages and disadvantages in each case were identified, because this improves our knowledge for our future development tasks.

In the case of the Bitcoin ZeroReserve, learning about this new monetary paradigm was indeed useful, but we noted as a possible software development opportunity using the virtual currency to support a pricing methodology regarding the informational content of financial products and services. Currently in the field of Computational Finance, increasing attention is being put on the information flows within the system as a way for explaining the behaviour of the financial variables, departing from the traditional computational finance applications relying either on artificial intelligence, game-theoretical algorithms, or on agent-based simulation testbeds.

It is known that the Achilles heel of Bitcoin is the reliability of exchanges performed using the soft money and the weaknesses of the associated price discovery mechanism. Indeed, one issue that is not noted here is that in our opinion, excessive emphasis is placed on banks, as the opposing theoretical model to the ZeroReserve. This might be misleading, as banks make just a fraction of the financial institutions present in the system. Anyway, most likely, Bitcoin will not be completed and functional until a proper billing engine is defined and implemented. And for implementation, usability tests will more likely require a complete project specification by themselves, because they will be at the core of the project success.

IV. Relation to Project
Our project relates to an implementation of a simple communication application which based on an Asterisk script, enables users to make calls from mesh potatoes to PSTN or GSM peers, using a VoIP based architecture. This means that almost the entire project is based on open source software and hardware, so the topic reviewed during the symposium closely relate to our project objectives. This is especially true in the case of the Firefox OS phone, which may be analysed as an alternative for hosting a client receiving calls from the mesh potato users. This would eliminate the excessive dependence of smartphones for actual application deployment.

V. Future Activities
Our intention is to continue working on our project at least for the rest of 2013, with further tasks possibly relating to planning a fully mesh communication network based on extensive use of Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) clients (e.g. Elastix or Trixbox) and closely following any new developments of the Firefox OS / Firefox phone as we presume this will be dominant technologies in the future

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Day 1 & 2 of CPUT FoSHS ’13

CPUT FOSHS ’13 [1, 2] has come and gone. Many thanks to our presenters, sponsors and colleagues that helped organize it. On day 1, Sydwell Williams gave an interesting talk on a bitcoin application for the CPUT and did some demonstrations. I must say it was another successful event. We had international speakers this year, and a number of colleagues and students came to the event. We also had the head of the institutional repository, CPUT and a number of other attendees outside the CPUT. Here are some tweets on it.

https://twitter.com/playingwithsid/status/388784696785510400

https://twitter.com/playingwithsid/status/388637084631973889

https://twitter.com/playingwithsid/status/388551068982198272

Video Presentations::

Mozilla: Firefox OS Tools and Apps by Arky

 

Zero Reserve by Rüdiger Koch

 

Other Video Presentations::

Firefox OS Tools/Translation Sprint by Arky (1)

Firefox OS Tools/Translation Sprint by Arky (2)

Firefox OS Tools/Translation Sprint by Arky (3)

Some Pictures from the Event

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